Success Story Follow-Up: Finding My Passion Through Healing

It’s Friday, everyone! And that means another Primal Blueprint Real Life Story from a Mark’s Daily Apple reader. If you have your own success story and would like to share it with me and the Mark’s Daily Apple community please contact me here. I’ll continue to publish these each Friday as long as they keep coming in. Thank you for reading!

This is a follow-up post from a former MDA success story, Andy Hnilo. In response to his original story, a number of readers had questions about Andy’s routine he used for healing and the ingredients his research showed were effective for various skin repair and restoration purposes. He’s answered those questions in this follow-up post. Enjoy, everyone!

After a car accident left me with seven broken ribs, a collapsed lung and “the worst compound fracture’ the maxillofacial specialist at the hospital had ever seen, my body was wrecked and my confidence not far behind. For any person, this would be a traumatic experience, but as a 30-year-old working actor and model, my future was suddenly completely unsure. As easy as it would have been to give up, my near-fatal accident turned out to be the ultimate blessing in disguise — that experience sparked the fire in my soul’s purpose. A walking ball of inflammation, I began researching ingredients for how I was going to accelerate my healing both internally and externally. Along the way, I shared everything I had learned about nutrition, natural healing, skincare and how to feel better about the reflection in the mirror with the rest of the world.

There came a point in my accident recovery where new passion, fun and hobby displaced my previous worry and intermittent pain. Researching and experimenting with various therapeutic ingredients became a creative outlet for me. While many of my friends found my new ‘hobby’ a bit crazy at times; I never let that stop me. In addition to the obvious results, I found a sense of encouragement for my recovery in researching and learning about certain studies and ingredients that helped others heal their scarring. It gave me hope and further validated the physiological capabilities of my ‘crazy’ concoctions.

For those of you like me, who share in the joy of science, biology and nature’s magic, I would love to share with you some of the most impressive research on the ingredients that accelerated the healing of my skin after my accident.

Skin Restorative Ingredients: What My Research Revealed

Medicinal Clays

It turns out, clays have been used therapeutically throughout various cultures. While one might be quick to discredit someone with mud on their face, the fact of the matter is there are many scientific discoveries associated with use of hydrated clays. There are 2500 scientific articles published in PubMed to sort the scientific works have been done on the effects of this clay on body function.

For example, Illite and Kaolin have ionic properties that affect antibacterial activity. In fact, studies have found that the natural and ion-exchanged illite clays significantly decrease bacterial load, skin inflammation and gross wound morphology. There’s even research that dives deeper into the chemistry of clay’s antibacterial effects, providing evidence that suggest some antibacterial clays can promote similar bactericidal (bacterial death inducing) reactions as effect as synthetic antibiotics. 1,2

Pearl Powder

Pearl Powder is perhaps the most sophisticated exfoliates created by Mother Nature. If you’re unfamiliar, Pearl is one of the well-known traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) tonics used for treating various skin disorders and beautifying the skin, mostly due to its abundant antioxidant, protein and mineral contents.

In one study, pearl powder supplemented people showed a substantial increase in total antioxidant capacity. Tests done found a significant increase in master antioxidants glutathione and SOD (superoxide dismutase) content and activity. It was also found that pearl considerably suppressed lipid peroxidation, which is the oxidative degradation of fats in the body. These outcomes sum up to one clear fact about pearl, it is a supremely potent antioxidant and thereby makes a novel, natural remedy for treating various age-related degenerative disorders. For me, this is the kind of data that helps me make sense of why pearl powder makes my skin soft and smooth. 3

Colostrum

Colostrum is yet another power-house ingredient backed by science. In short, it is a natural source of many important vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and amino acids. However, perhaps the most impressive part of colostrum is its unique content of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1).

In regards to skin health and regeneration, colostrum and its IGF-1 content sparked great interest for me. IGF factor 1 (IGF-I) is widely distributed in various tissues, including the skin. It turns out, IGF-I is strongly expressed in injured areas, where it plays an important role in epidermal and dermal wound healing. Repeated studies have shown the beneficial effects of topically applied IGF-I on wound healing, due to its stimulating effects on collagen synthesis in skin fibroblasts, the proliferation of fibroblasts and keratinocytes, and angiogenesis. 4,5 As collagen production starts to decline with age, it is essential to make healthy skin care a priority by choosing products with ingredients that will keep your skin functioning at its peak, no matter what age you are. 6,7

In simpler terms, colostrum promotes the regeneration of fresh skin. I greatly attribute my regular use of colostrum and its effects to a surprisingly minimal appearance of scarring after my accident.

Pracaxi/Acai Oil

After my accident, I had the worst compound jaw fracture the resident maxillofacial surgeon of Cedars Sinai had ever seen. We actually had to hire a private surgeon and he assisted him. So you can only imagine the wounds that inflicted my face, negatively affecting the integrity of my skin. Normally, intense wounds means equally intense skin scarring. Luckily, scar formation itself varies based on many factors and can be mitigated by therapeutic agents, such as the beneficial fatty acids found in pracaxi oil.

According to clinical research, the topical application pracaxi oil to injured skin led to considerable improvements in wound healing and scar attributes. Additionally, it has been found that acai oil, applied topically to diabetic ulcerations can dramatically improve healing, up to 100%. With my initial fear of scarring after my accident, discovering natural ingredients with regenerative abilities were a true saving grace. 8 9

Plant-derived Stem Cells

When I said I was willing to try anything to improve my recovery, I meant it. Somewhere along my journey, I came across compelling research on the use of plant stem cells for skin regeneration. The science and use of plant-stem cells is an interest focus for leading edge cosmetic treatment. When you consider the unique self-pairing, tissue regenerative processes of plants; it’s amazing to think that we could utilize their cells to also assist our skin cells in regeneration. That’s what plant stem-cell science is all about and it’s quite intriguing.

According to the research and experimentation, plant-stem cells contain phytohormones that have an antioxidant effect on the skin. In fact, one study found that a product derived of plant-stem cells greatly reduced wrinkles in the crow’s feet area of the face 10. It was found that the depth of face wrinkles became shallower by 8% after 2 weeks and shallower by 15% after 4 weeks. 11

Plant-Derived Vitamin A

Vitamin A plays major regulatory roles in the functioning and health of the skin matrix. Vitamin A is typically found in two forms; carotene or retinol. However, with the help of modern technology, we are capable of extracting a retinol-like plant-based vitamin A, derived of the popular superfood, Alfalfa.

Plant-derived Vitamin A has some amazing science behind it. Sourced organically from France, it contains similar beneficial polysaccharides as retinol, called galactomannans. This gives plant-derived vitamin A retinol-like-activity because it’s working on similar biological markers. Best of all, it achieves these effects without inducing irritancy on the skin like Retinol so often does. It can greatly improve the appearance and health of aged skin by significantly reducing fine lines and Crow’s feet.

In fact, study has found that topical plant-derived Vitamin A improves fine wrinkles associated with natural aging. The induction of glycosaminoglycan; beneficial mucopolysaccharides, increase collagen production and are most likely responsible for the minimization of fine lines. Additionally, plant-derived Vitamin A treated skin improves skin matrix synthesis, making it more resilient to skin injury and ulceration. 12

CoQ10

Also known as ubiquinone coenzyme q10, CoQ10 is an endogenously synthesized lipid-soluble antioxidant, which is essential for cellular energy production. However, like all aging, this precious molecule is diminished with skin aging too. Stress of all sorts all tend to decrease the antioxidant presence and activity of coQ10. Luckily, both dietary and topical Q10 treatment is incredibly beneficial with regard to effective Q10 replenishment.

In study, application of Q10-containing formulas significantly increased the levels of this particular quinone in the skin surface and even in the deeper layers of the epidermis. More importantly was the effect this had on the skin; the results founds that stressed-skin improved by reduction of free radicals and the increase in antioxidant capacity. In other words, the topical use of CoQ10 improves the skin’s resilience to oxidative stress. Considering that oxidative stress results in the well-known signs of skin aging, like the appearance of wrinkles and lines as well as loss of elasticity, CoQ10 application serves as a useful anti-aging novelty. These are just a few of the reasons I feature CoQ10 in both my Night Cream and Gold Serum. 13, 14, 15

How I Applied My Research To My Routine

Purely through self-experimentation and trial and error, what made most sense to me was combining THE best, most effective ingredients that I could source from nature along with the latest and greatest in cutting edge science. The process began by isolating carefully sourced ingredients based on texture alone, then combining them with different carrier oils then moving forward and adding essential oils and extracts that fit my creation and desired emulsion.

I knew I wanted a dense feel that would be there throughout the night, nourishing and healing the scar area through deep hydration. I tried a couple products in the beginning before making my own, and they would absorb quickly leaving me questioning its level of effectiveness if it is gone within minutes. What made the most sense to me is a rich concentrated emulsion that was thicker, therefore moisturizing the target areas for longer periods of time. Devoid of harsh, drying ingredients. In search for the perfect blend of botanicals, it was fascinating to me to learn of certain ingredients like Sea Buckthorn and find out about it’s very rare Omega-7 fatty acid capacity.

In my night cream specifically, in a cast iron pan, I would melt down thicker ingredients like Beeswax, Cacao Butter and Manuka honey then combine with cold-pressed oils to create an highly concentrated, nourishing emulsion for my skin that I would apply after rinsing off The Clay Mask. I still have that first concoction with little dimples of cacao butter strewn throughout, preserved solely by K-Factor 16 Manuka Honey. That concoction turned into what is now, our award-winning Alitura Night Cream.

As you can see, my skin-care craze isn’t as whacky as it seems—there is credible scientific evidence that backs my madness. In a culture that is quick to go under the knife or get an injection it’s imperative to remember that none of those options actually help keeping the appearance of the skin youthful and glowing. Using skincare products that are dense in topical nutrients are vital for healthy looking skin. 16,17 At this point, you’re likely wondering how to put it all to practice. So, without further ado, I’m happy to share with you my personal skincare routine…

Here’s What It Looks Like To Date:

Pearl Cleansing: I start off my skin-care routine with a traditional step; cleansing. However, I use a not-so-conventional cleanser, the Pearl Cleanser. As we discussed, this unique cleanser cleans the skin while protecting it from the stressful effects of free radicals.
*Wet your face with warm, clean water
*Apply the cleanser with your hands, gently working it into the skin
*Wash it off
*Let your face dry

Derma Rolling: Next up is Derma Rolling. Derma rolling is one of the most powerful weapons for getting the what I call the “Alitura Glow.” This is one of the many high-end medi spas best kept secrets. Microneedling, a.k.a. Collagen Induction Therapy, is exactly that: an effective way to stimulate collagen synthesis and simultaneously break down malformed tissue such as acne and surgical scars (keloid scars are the exception as Microneedling can cause more keloid scarring).18 It works by creating “micro-tears” or generating acute, inflammation, that initiates the healing or regeneration of the outer layer of the skin. It also helps open the poors up, allowing any of the medicinal ingredients in your serums or moisturizers to absorb more deeper.

Home-use vs. Medical Microneedling has everything to do with needle size. The Alitura Dermaroller comes in .25 mm, .5 mm, and 1 mm needle sizes making it ideal for safe home use. Within just a few treatments over the course of 6-8 weeks you will notice visible changes in the texture of your skin at the surface level and plumpness and contour since your dermis has more collagen giving the understructure a firmer foundation for a more youthful contour to the jawline and cheekbones.

In addition to these benefits, derma-rolling can improve collagen synthesis, heal scars, prevents premature skin aging, reduces stretch marks and helps balance skin tone. 19

Clay Mask: My third step is to follow up Derma Rolling with The Alitura Clay Mask. As we’ve discussed, the mask on its own is a wonder treatment that thoroughly purifies, exfoliates, detoxifies and revitalizes the skin by stimulating blood flow. Combined with the Derma Roller; however, the benefits are increased exponentially!

Check this article out for full instructions on how to use the Clay Mask.

Alitura Night Cream: I ‘stack’ my Night Cream and Gold Serum before bed. I apply a thin layer of The Gold Serum all over my face, neck and eye area and then follow with thin layer of The Night Cream as a protective, ultra-hydrating barrier that deeply conditions the dermal layer of my skin which is the most important time to do so, while you are in one position for hours. Wake up looking renewed, refreshed and with a plump, radiant complexion. Great way to start the day if you ask me! Enjoy 🙂

To me, there truly is nothing better than feeling good with your what you see in the mirror. One thing I don’t touch on enough is that my journey into skincare really started in college where I became insecure to take my shirt off because of bad back acne that I had. Growing into my body, hormones racing, using poor products and consuming inflammatory dormitory food at UC Berkeley led to it. It was a bit deflating to wake up and see some type of irritation on my face and body and it really bugged me. Made me self conscious. It was then and there that I started to pinpoint the problem. I was a scrawny freshman athlete at Cal, and needed to gain weight quickly as a Division 1 Pac-10 athlete, so I was always scouring the back of food labels for the big three: 1) Protein 2) Calories 3) Fat. That attention to detail on labels led me to look down into ingredients on skin and hair-care as well. Tossing the heavily marketed, big brand name skincare for a better, cleaner ingredient deck yielded results and my knowledge grew year after year.

After my accident that knowledge grew quickly as I voraciously read and researched ingredients and topical remedies to heal myself. It has been said that ‘necessity is the mother of invention,’ and I couldn’t agree more. My accident not only led to me finding my passion through healing myself, but I found my purpose along the way. To be able to share what I have created with people all over the world in an effort to make people feel better about what THEY see in the mirror… it gives me goosebumps as I type this. I am grateful.

I want to give a HUGE thank you to the incredible people at Mark’s Daily Apple, Primal Blueprint, Primal Kitchen, and of course Mark Sisson for letting me share a piece of my journey. Thank you for reading.

All the best,
Andy Hnilo
CEO & Founder
Alitura Naturals

The readers featured in our success stories share their experiences in their own words. The Primal Blueprint and Keto Reset diets are not intended as medical intervention or diagnosis. Nor are they replacements for working with a qualified healthcare practitioner. It’s important to speak with your doctor before beginning any new dietary or lifestyle program, and please consult your physician before making any changes to medication or treatment protocols. Each individual’s results may vary.

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References:

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26508716
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3126108/
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29389568
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4184407/#b5-ijn-9-4551
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4184407/#b6-ijn-9-4551
  6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4089350/
  7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1606623/
  8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4257951/
  9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4857298/
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5674215/#B11
  11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5674215/
  12. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17515510
  13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4737275/#biof1239-bib-0004
  14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4737275/#biof1239-bib-0003
  15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4737275/
  16. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4428712/
  17. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3583891/
  18. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4976400/

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The Best 17 Keto-Vegan-Paleo Recipes

Thanks to the good folks at Paleohacks for today’s recipe.

Is it possible to go keto while omitting all dairy and animal products as well? It might seem difficult, but these 17 keto-friendly vegan and Paleo recipes can get you started.

The biggest challenge to going keto (and otherwise restricting your diet) is the frustrating perceived lack of variety when it comes to meals. We’re here to prove that even when following the keto, Paleo and vegan diets, you can still eat well.

From breakfasts, to snacks, to lunch, dinner and dessert, there’s something for every meal of the day. Enjoy fluffy coconut flour flatbread to sandwich your favorite toppings, or healthy mint chocolate fudge for a treat. You’ll find inspiration all over this list.

These five-ingredient, five-minute low-carb crunch protein bars are basically healthy candy bars. Plus, there are lots of modifications you can follow to best suit your diet.

This easy, fluffy flatbread will fool anyone—it’s just as good as the original, gluten-laden kind. Psyllium husk functions as the “egg-like” binder in this recipe, making it totally vegan in addition to Paleo and keto.

This simple Shamrock shake recipe is way better than the fast food original, but just as (naturally) green—thanks, avocado! Vanilla and mint extracts lend the shake its distinct flavor.

Need a craving-busting chocolatey treat? These chocolate espresso bombs use whole ingredients, including cacao powder, nut butter and espresso powder. They’re full of healthy fats that will keep you satiated in between meals.

This inventive bento box assemblage includes seaweed “noodles” with your choice of raw or toasted almonds, an herbaceous heirloom tomato and cucumber salad, protein-packed guacamole and chunks of coconut and carrot. It makes for one refreshing, colorful and healthy lunch!

Packed with Mexican spices like cumin and cilantro, this Mexican cauliflower rice makes the perfect accompaniment to any main dish.

Silky mint chocolate fudge that’s dairy and sugar-free? It’s true! This simple recipe is ready in under an hour and requires only a blender and a fridge.

The secret to these crunchy, chocolate mint, no-bake protein bars is the crunchy almond butter—but smooth almond butter will also work in a pinch. Adorn your bars with chia seeds, coconut, cacao nibs or almonds for added flavor and texture.

These chocolatey-coffee-nutty treats will keep you satiated all day long, thanks to the addition of almonds, flax meal, hemp seeds, almond butter and coconut oil. Be sure to omit the maple syrup or swap in a keto-compliant sweetener.

Don’t be fooled by the pictures—there’s no actual pasta to be found here! Kohlrabi noodles make for a flavorful, healthy dish, while a homemade, dairy-free Alfredo adds an ultra-creamy mouthfeel. This recipe uses pre-prepped noodles and cauliflower rice, but you can always make those at home with a food processor and spiralizer.

These fat bombs are loaded with puckering citrus flavor from lemon juice and zest as well as coconut butter, coconut oil and low-carb blueberries—or whatever berries you prefer.

Need a big bowl of comfort, with none of the guilt? This low-carb mac and cheese recipe uses hearty cauliflower in place of noodles, while tahini, olive oil and spices make it super creamy and tasty.

Well-spiced, creamy spinach gets whipped up quickly in the Instant Pot. Opt for coconut oil over ghee to keep it vegan, and serve over a bed of cauliflower rice.

These simple, uber-creamy and chocolatey fudgesicles take minutes to prep. Opt for stevia over the maple syrup and add more coconut milk to keep it keto.

Need a big bowl of Mediterranean-inspired, veggie-packed goodness? This salad boasts cauliflower, artichoke hearts, bell pepper, cucumber, tomatoes and more.

This simple tabbouleh recipe subs in cauliflower for traditional grains. It’s herbaceous, lemony and perfect to dip all your favorite vegetables in.

Missing bread on your restricted diet? This magic, low-carb mug bread comes together in minutes and requires only a handful of wholesome ingredients. Be sure to use a vegan egg substitute to keep it vegan.

Thanks again to Paleohacks for the awesome recipe list today. Have your own favorite low-carb plant-based favorites? Share below. 

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Top 12 Keto Blogs

With the explosion of keto, there’s an ever growing constant stream of new information about the significant benefits, supposed risks, and varying “rules” for how to adopt a keto diet. As with most things, it’s easy to get sucked into information overload. (And that doesn’t even take into account the hype that unfortunately gets distributed like wildfire around the Internet.) You want sources you can count on for facts, reason, and utility. Here are twelve solid sources I’d recommend for intelligent commentary, sound science, and useful ideas.

1) Mark’s Daily Apple

Sure, this isn’t an exclusively keto blog. It’s a Primal living blog—with attention to all the components that figure into a healthy lifestyle and fulfilling life. But keto is a powerful tool I use within the Primal Blueprint template. As most of you already know, I approach keto specifically through a Primal lens—what I call a Primal-keto approach to keto living that prioritizes optimum nutrition with the least amount of pain, suffering and sacrifice. I know it’s been working for a lot of people, and I’ll continue to to write on it as well as all the other elements of a healthy life. Four particular resources I’d suggest to folks new to keto: the MDA Keto Hub, our Keto Recipes, the Primal Blueprint Keto Podcast, and our private Keto Reset Facebook Group. They’re all free resources for anyone to use and enjoy. For those who want to receive an additional Mark’s Daily Apple monthly email with exclusive information and commentary on keto, you can sign up below for the Keto Reset Digest (also free).

2) Virta Blog

Virta is a groundbreaking health organization using keto to treat—even reverse—type 2 diabetes and associated metabolic disorders. The Virta Blog is an must-read, providing a mix of cutting edge science, easy to understand articles regarding practical aspects of going keto, and inspiring success stories.

3) Tuit Nutrition

I love Amy Berger’s common sense approach to keto on Tuit Nutrition. She calls her approach Keto Without the Crazy, and that about sums it up. Her articles are long but very worth reading.

4) Ruled.me

At Ruled.me you’ll find mostly long-form articles that contain a ton of information about the keto diet. The site also provides an extensive recipe collection and other resources.

5) Healthful Pursuit

Healthful Pursuit is the home of Nutrition Educator and keto guru Leanne Vogel. Leanne provides a blend of blog posts, videos, and recipes to help you go keto in a healthy way. Much of the content is focused on keto for women, but men and women alike can benefit from the info provided.

6) Calories Proper

At Calories Proper, Dr. Bill Lagakos covers a wide range of topics related to nutrition, fasting, circadian biology, and much more. While it’s not a keto blog per se, keto is a frequent topic. In any case, you’re sure to learn a lot from the content here, which is heavily focused on reviewing and critiquing empirical research studies in an understandable way.

7) Ketogenic Athlete

Ketogenic Athlete is a well-rounded blog for strength and endurance athletes who are interested in using keto for training and performance.

8) The MAF Files at philmaffetone.com

Dr. Phil Maffetone has been using low-carb and keto diets to help athletes achieve breakthrough athletic performance for decades. His 180-age formula is a cornerstone of my Primal Endurance approach to become and fat- and keto-adapted athlete. The MAF Files covers a variety of topics that will be of interest to Primal and keto athletes.

9) HVMN

HVMN offers the only commercially available ketone ester supplement. The blog reflects their target audience: athletes and other high performers who are interested in using diet and lifestyle modifications—and possibly exogenous supplementation, of course—to harness the power of ketones.

10) Elana’s Pantry

Elana Amsterdam has long been one of my go-to sources for healthy, delicious paleo recipes, but more recently she has been using keto as part of her strategy to address her MS. I’ve never made an Elana’s Pantry recipe that wasn’t excellent. She also writes about a variety of topics related to health.

11) Castaway Kitchen

Christina Kurp shares how she used a combination of AIP and keto to fix her own health issues. Part wellness blog, part scrumptious recipe collection, Castaway Kitchen is a great resource for anyone looking for food inspo, especially if you have dietary restrictions.

12) Cast Iron Keto

Plainly put, Cast Iron Keto has food I like to eat: simple, delicious, keto-friendly. You’ll find lots of keto-fied classics here suitable for kids and non-keto types (making dinner that much easier).

Thanks for stopping in today, everyone. Have a favorite you didn’t see here? Share down below. Take care.

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Weekly Link Love — Edition 23

Last call to enter the Mark’s Daily Apple Ultimate Coffee Giveaway. This one closes Monday (4/8/19) at midnight PDT.

Research of the Week

Testosterone-induced aggression may be mediated by dopamine.

Cognitive reappraisal can make a workout seem easier.

In alcoholics, brain damage progresses even after they stop drinking.

Scientists may have debunked the existence of “depression genes.”

Sugar crash, not sugar rush.

Was fat more important for human brain development than meat?

Omega-3s tied to less asthma in children.

Both low and too-high intakes of sodium are linked to increased mortality. Around 4.5 grams per day seems to be optimal.

New Primal Blueprint Podcasts

Episode 323: Ste Lane: Host Elle Russ chats with Primal Health coach Ste Lane.

Episode 324: Keto: Discipline, Structure, Accountability, and Social Influences: Host Brad Kearns gets into social contagions.

Health Coach Radio Episode 6: Dr. Bo Neichoy: Dr. Bo Neichoy is a bariatric doctor whose clinic is staffed almost entirely by health coaches.

Each week, select Mark’s Daily Apple blog posts are prepared as Primal Blueprint Podcasts. Need to catch up on reading, but don’t have the time? Prefer to listen to articles while on the go? Check out the new blog post podcasts below, and subscribe to the Primal Blueprint Podcast here so you never miss an episode.

Media, Schmedia

Unhealthy diets are bigger killers than cigarettes and hypertension, experts say. Gotta love how they lump red meat in with “processed meat, sugar-sweetened beverages, and trans fats.”

The VA is set to partner with VirtaHealth to help vets with type 2 diabetes try low-carb.

Interesting Blog Posts

How blind people think about color.

How to use embodied movement practice to improve your squat.

Social Notes

Taking Dear Mark queries.

Everything Else

Another disease of civilization: “slowness rage.”

The Fall of the Vegan Prince.

A lot of incredible news came out on April 1st, but cloned mammoth meat has really got me interested.

Intermittent chemo.

Things I’m Up to and Interested In

I was surprised to see “April 2”: Snorting sugar could help fight respiratory illness.

I laughed: Morning routines normal people swear by.

Concept I found interesting: ADHD as the entrepreneurial trait.

I’m not holding my breath: “…followers of low-carb eating are hoping for a nod of approval in the upcoming U.S. dietary guidelines that advise Americans on what to eat.”

Another April 1st near miss: Oral sex associated with less miscarriage.

Question I’m Asking

Are you hoping for an official embrace of low-carb/Primal/keto eating by the authorities/experts/medical community?

Recipe Corner

Time Capsule

One year ago (Mar 31 – Apr 6)

Comment of the Week

“About to have my first child (Wife is in early labor now) I think i am going to need some coffee.”

– You don’t know how right you are, Brett.

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The Definitive Guide To What Breaks a Fast

One of the most common questions I get is “Does [x] break a fast?”

What they’re really inquiring about is: “Does this interfere with, negate, or nullify the benefits of fasting?”

These benefits include:

Ketosis: Fasting is the quickest way to get into ketosis, an metabolic state characterized by increasing fat burning, fat adaptation, and—in some people—improved cognitive function.

Fat Loss: When you’re fasting, you’re not eating, and not eating is the best way to force your body to burn the fat it already possesses. Fasting also means no additional calories are coming in, and many people find that fasting is a great way to control their calorie intake.

Autophagy: Autophagy, or “self-eating,” is the process by which our cells prune damaged components, maintain proper function, and keep aging at bay. Fasting triggers autophagy. Breaking the fast will stop autophagy.

Let’s go through the most popular queries one by one and figure out how each one affects an intermittent fast.

Common Drinks

Coffee

Depends on who you ask. Some say the fact that coffee triggers a metabolic response means it breaks the fast. I say that coffee increases fat mobilization and burning, independently triggers autophagy (something we’re looking for when we fast), and makes it easier to stave off hunger. For my full treatment, check out this post on coffee and fasting.

I’m going to say “no.”

Tea

Tea contains no calories, improves metabolic health, and can aid fat burning. All signs point to it being great during a fast. Of course, if you had a tablespoon of sugar and a half cup of milk, you’re breaking the fast. But tea itself is a great addition.

I’m going to say “no.”

Yerba Mate

Yerba mate is essentially non-caloric, like tea or black coffee. It also has beneficial effects on glucose tolerance, which is a big plus.

I’m going to say “no.”

Bone Broth

I covered this in full a few months ago. Go read that post. In short, a bit is probably okay. Just keep in mind that the more gelatinous your broth is, the more collagen protein it will contain and the greater its potential to inhibit autophagy. This isn’t established in humans yet (see the collagen section below), but it’s worth considering. A nice salty broth has gotten many a faster through a tough fast, especially if they’re still learning the ropes and need some electrolytes.

I’m going to say “technically yes” but “realistically no.”

Lemon Water

A tablespoon of fresh squeezed lemon juice has a couple calories and a decent amount of potassium. Combined with salt, lemon water is actually a nice way to hydrate during a fast without breaking it.

I’m going to say “no.”

Diet Soda

Diet soda may mess with your gut. It’s linked to weight issues, though not conclusively and certainly not in a causative manner; it’s just as likely that the relationship can be explained by overweight and unhealthy people using diet sodas in a bid to lose weight. I don’t like them myself, and I’ve witnessed people fail to ever kick the sweet tooth as long as they drank diet sodas. But many people find they do improve dietary adherence and do improve fasting tolerance. If that’s the case, they are very pro-fasting.

I’m going to say “no.”

Juice

A juice fast isn’t really a fast. You’re consuming fewer calories than you might eating normal food, but you’re still consuming a good number of calories—most of them carbohydrate, no less.

I’m going to say “yes” unless you’re specifically engaging in “juice fasting,” in which case it’s still not fasting despite what you call it.

Common Drink Additions/Condiments

Cream (Unsweetened)

Technically, as a source of calories, cream breaks a fast. But it doesn’t provoke an insulin response when consumed in isolation, it doesn’t impact ketosis, and many people find it makes sticking to the fast easier.

I’m going to say “technically yes, but realistically no—just keep it to a couple teaspoons or less.”

Almond Milk

It depends on the almond milk. A full cup of the standard sugar-free almond milk has just 36 calories, about a gram of carbs, 2 grams of fat, and a gram of protein. That’s almost nothing. You could probably get away with a quarter or third cup and have minimal impact on your fast, but why not just drink some water or coffee?

I’m going to say “technically yes,” but you can get away with a little bit.

Butter

Like cream, butter doesn’t provoke an insulin response in isolation. It’s more calorically dense than cream, though, so watch how much you eat.

I’m going to say “technically yes, but realistically no as long as you’re not using more than a teaspoon.”

MCT Oil/Coconut Oil

MCT oil is pure fat and thus calorically dense, but it has three benefits going for it. First, it doesn’t provoke an insulin response in isolation. Two, it increases energy expenditure. Three, it converts directly to ketones. People new to fasting can often speed up the fat adaptation process by incorporating a little MCT oil. Coconut oil is the main source of MCT oil, so it’ll have similar effects, though not as pronounced.

I’m going to say “technically yes, but realistically no—and it may even enhance your fasting experience when consumed in moderation.”

Cinnamon

I don’t advise eating cinnamon alone, dry, and isolated. It’s a terrible and potentially deadly idea. But in some coffee or tea during a fast? Sure. It can even improve insulin sensitivity.

I’m going to say “no.”

Salt

Salt does not break a fast. Actually, adding a pinch or two of salt to your water during a fast can increase your tolerance of the fasting process and improve hydration status.

I’m going to say “no.”

Non-caloric Sweeteners—First Natural, Then Artificial

Stevia

Stevia contains no calories and has no effect on insulin secretion (if anything, it increases insulin sensitivity). However, it’s often used to sweeten foods that do contain calories, so be mindful of how you’re using it.

I’m going to say “no.”

Monk Fruit

For a good overview of monk fruit, read this. Suffice it to say, monk fruit is similar to stevia in that it’s a non-caloric, naturally-occurring sweetener with unique health effects. It will not break your fast.

I’m going to say “no.”

Swerve

Swerve is a sweetener that blends erythritol (a sugar alcohol) and oligosaccharides (a prebiotic fiber that tastes kinda sweet) with natural flavors. Erythritol has no effect on insulin or blood glucose (you just pee it out mostly). I couldn’t find any studies on oligosaccharides during a fast, but as humans cannot by definition digest them, they shouldn’t affect the course of a fast.

I’m going to say “no.”

Xylitol

See the gum section above. Stick to reasonable amounts.

I’m going to say “no.”

Sucralose (a.k.a. Splenda)

Sucralose does not provoke an insulin response or increase blood glucose—great news for fasters who want to use it—but it does seem to impair whole body insulin sensitivity. That’s bad for everyone.

I’m going to say “no,” but there are other downsides.

Aspartame

Those same studies on monk fruit and stevia also tested aspartame, finding similar results. Aspartame does not provoke an insulin or glucose response. I’m no fan of the stuff, but I don’t see any evidence that it will break a fast.

I’m going to say “no.”

Supplementary Powders, Oils, Etc.

CBD Oil

Assuming you’re doing the kind of hemp oil that comes in droppers and not the kind that you pour from a culinary oil bottle, the caloric content can’t possibly impact your fast. There are no studies examining the metabolic effects of CBD in the fasted state, but I don’t see any reason why it would impact ketosis, autophagy, or fat-burning—and without psychoactive THC involved, you won’t be getting the munchies.

I’m going to say “no.”

Protein Powder

Protein powder provokes an insulin response, which opposes autophagy, which means you’re breaking your fast. Plus, protein powder contains calories.

I’m going to say “yes.”

Collagen

If you’re strict and technical, then yes, collagen breaks a fast. There’s evidence that glycine—the most prominent amino acid in collagen—can inhibit autophagy, but it was a convoluted animal study where inhibiting autophagy with large doses of glycine after brain injury actually improved outcomes. It probably doesn’t apply to someone adding a scoop of collagen to their coffee. Besides, even if it slightly reduces autophagy, a little collagen won’t negatively impact ketosis, fat-burning, or energy intake.

I’m going to say “technically yes,” but “realistically no.” Avoid if your main focus is autophagy, though.

Branch Chain Amino Acids (BCAAs)

BCAAs trigger an insulin response and thus stop autophagy and the fast. That said, many proponents of fasted training recommend using BCAAs before a workout to help preserve muscle and improve the post-workout anabolic response.

I’m going to say “yes.”

Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar is made by double fermenting the sugars present in apple juice. First, yeast convert the sugars to alcohol. Next, the alcohol converts to acetic acid. The result is a liquid that’s virtually calorie-free. Studies showing that consuming vinegar lowers the blood glucose response to a subsequent meal aren’t really relevant if you’re fasting, but they don’t hurt.

I’m going to say “no.”

Electrolyte Powder/Tabs

Electrolyte powders/tabs used to come festooned with sucrose, making them decidedly anti-fasting. These days, most of them are sweetened with stevia or some other natural non-caloric sweetener. Even the ones that have a little bit of sugar (1-2 g) are probably okay to consume without much negative effect. Best of all, electrolytes can really help you tolerate a fast.

I’m going to say “no.”

Breath-Freshening Items

Gum

If we’re talking sugar-rich gum, the answer is yes. Those definitely break a fast. If we’re talking xylitol gum, the answer is more mixed. In healthy individuals, 30 grams of pure xylitol triggers a small but significant rise in glucose and insulin. That might sound scary to a prospective IFer, but most people aren’t chewing gum made with 30 grams of xylitol. The average piece of xylitol gum barely weighs a gram.

I’m going to say “no,” unless you’re chewing gum made with real sugar or you’re throwing back 30 pieces of xylitol gum in a sitting.

Toothpaste

I always consume my toothpaste (around a tablespoon of the good stuff per brushing) and I’ve never had it knock me out of ketosis, autophagy, or in any way shape or form break my fast. I’m kidding. I don’t consume my toothpaste, but brushing your teeth doesn’t break a fast.

I’m going to say “no.” Don’t eat it though.

Mouthwash

Pretty much the same as toothpaste. Look for a brand that doesn’t contain sugar or one of the artificial sweeteners above that trips insulin. As the instructions (and common sense) suggest, don’t drink it.

That’s it, folks. If you have additional questions about what does or doesn’t break a fast, leave them down below. Thanks for reading, and I hope you found the post helpful. Forward it on if you did.

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References:

Hansson P, Holven KB, Øyri LKL, et al. Meals with Similar Fat Content from Different Dairy Products Induce Different Postprandial Triglyceride Responses in Healthy Adults: A Randomized Controlled Cross-Over Trial. J Nutr. 2019;149(3):422-431.

Anton SD, Martin CK, Han H, et al. Effects of stevia, aspartame, and sucrose on food intake, satiety, and postprandial glucose and insulin levels. Appetite. 2010;55(1):37-43.

Ili? V, Vukmirovi? S, Stilinovi? N, ?apo I, Arsenovi? M, Milijaševi? B. Insight into anti-diabetic effect of low dose of stevioside. Biomed Pharmacother. 2017;90:216-221.

Noda K, Nakayama K, Oku T. Serum glucose and insulin levels and erythritol balance after oral administration of erythritol in healthy subjects. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1994;48(4):286-92.

Müller-hess R, Geser CA, Bonjour JP, Jéquier E, Felber JP. Effects of oral xylitol administration on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in normal subjects. Infusionsther Klin Ernahr. 1975;2(4):247-52.

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I Saw the Extra Weight I’d Carried My Whole Life Slip Away

It’s Monday, everyone! And that means another Primal Blueprint Real Life Story from a Mark’s Daily Apple reader. If you have your own success story and would like to share it with me and the Mark’s Daily Apple community please contact me here. I’ll continue to publish these each Monday as long as they keep coming in. Thank you for reading!

My visual transformation isn’t all that impressive. In fact, despite having a completely different body composition, I weigh more or less the same that I did six years ago.

My real transformation has occurred on the inside and in the way that I try to embody the Primal Blueprint principles in the way I live my life.

Before Primal Living:

  • Out of shape
  • Abysmal self-esteem
  • Without a clear life path

6 Years Since Discovering Mark’s Daily Apple:

  • Owns a Health & Fitness blog and coaching business
  • Inspires others to find their self-esteem through leading by example
  • Recreational athlete in Powerlifting, Strongman and Highland Games
  • Loving life every day

I first heard of Mark and his message about primal health back in 2013. At the time, my husband and I were living in a modest cabin in the woods of Northern Maine and the extent of my fitness routine was the obligatory jog now and then or some exercise videos that mostly involved bodyweight training. Our cabin had no electricity or running water which meant that we were gathering, cutting and stacking firewood by hand so that we could stay warm during the long winters. Turning manure, bending over in the garden, hauling hay for our goats and clearing woods for future pasture were serious back killing chores and we knew we needed to find a way to get stronger in order to support our active lifestyle. Coupled with this was my husband’s chronic GI distress and autoimmune condition, Reactive Arthritis, which led us down the road of research into how a grain-free, sugar free diet could improve those ailments.

As is often the case, primal nutrition and heavy lifting principles were deeply entwined from the very beginning of our journey towards optimal health. And as we cut out wheat and sugar, we also began learning the functional movements of the squat, deadlift and pull-up. With a manual treadmill we found in the barn, we regularly blasted ourselves with intervals after reading from you the importance of sprinting. Your fitness principles of walk far, run fast, lift heavy came so naturally to us and in the setting of the lush, Maine woods, it felt that much more primal to get in tune with our ancestral physiques.

You might imagine that the stronger and more fit we became, the more we wanted to eat better to support that. Before long, our backs felt bulletproof chopping and stacking piles of firewood. My husband’s arthritis improved. I was seeing the extra weight I had carried my whole life slip away. We had gone to the woods to seek a lifestyle where we could call the shots and pursue our healthiest existence. But in the process, we had the rude awakening that our bodies were the weakest link in the chain of health. Our minds were strong and our homestead was strong, but our bodies were not. And so when we saw the benefits of the Primal Blueprint massively improve our existence, it was like coming out of a bad dream and I woke up one morning thinking “hey, this is really something to live for.”

While I graduated college with a degree in writing, I never really had found my purpose or a career I was passionate about giving my 9 to 5 energy to. I always believed that I had a lot to share with the world, but couldn’t conceive of what avenue to take, but with this new primal lifestyle, I discovered a completely unexpected passion. Always the chubby book nerd my whole life, taking on sports in school out of social pressure and obligation but never out of true interest, here I was, suddenly wanting to pursue fitness and wellness as a career.

We ended up leaving our little homestead for my husband to travel down the long (and still not complete) road of becoming a Dentist. He studied for biochemistry and tests and I studied strength and conditioning in between my long hours at Starbucks. (Side note: I managed to make it 2 years working there without consuming sugar and my coworkers would always marvel at my dedication of turning down a free Frappuccino. I explained to them that eating primal, my energy was consistent throughout the day and better than ever and seeing the positive effects of my nutrition in my day to day life was all the motivation I needed to persist.) The years we spent studying for our individual pursuits, we also spend wrecking ourselves on the barbell and on the field doing sprints and without following any strict program, we simply tried to remember to walk far, run fast, lift heavy. Slowly and surely, our body composition improved and I took on my first personal training clients.

Now living in Salt Lake City, I think of myself more as a Strength Coach than a personal trainer and before walking that road I didn’t even realize there was a difference. I see my colleagues often get wrapped up in ideal programming principles and I try to remember the basics: pick up heavy stuff and put it overhead using good technique, train for explosive speed and go on long hikes outdoors.

I use my personal experience to help guide my athletes on the emotional journey of becoming strong and realizing their physical potential. I have so many people, primarily women, come to me saying they want to lose weight. But as we begin working together, they quickly see that in fact their goal is much more complex that a number on the scale. They learn that it feels good to get strong and learn how to move in ways they never thought possible. I see the look of fear in their eyes at approaching a back squat for the first time and I recognize that look of fear because it’s the same one I felt when I started my journey. I see timid women who hate their bodies do a pull-up for the first time after working hard for a year and then it’s like poof… now they love their bodies because they unlocked this talent for strength they never knew they had. When that happens, the number on the scale matters so much less to them because now they have a performance goal. Now they are pursuing health rather than weight loss.

Although I am not strictly a Primal Blueprint coach, I still hold onto those principles while I teach other people how to lift and what strategies they can use to build balanced nutrition. I encourage them to seek nutrient-dense foods rather than counting macros or calories and to eat when hunger ensues naturally rather than adhering to six small meals a day. I feel confident coaching strategies like Keto and Intermittent Fasting because I have done the research on the health benefits and have the anecdotal evidence to back it up from my own experience. I am always trying to do what your blog did for me, which is to teach them ways they can figure out what health uniquely means to them. I still try to embody the idea that you instilled in me: study how our ancestors thrived to learn how to seek our healthy existence in a world that can often be toxic.

My transformation doesn’t come through in a before and after photo, but I believe I have gained a million times more than if I had lost 100 lbs and cured 10 autoimmune conditions. I discovered my life’s path and spend every day trying to guide others to do the same.

Thank you,
Hill

primalpillarsstrength.com
Instagram @primalpillars

The readers featured in our success stories share their experiences in their own words. The Primal Blueprint and Keto Reset diets are not intended as medical intervention or diagnosis. Nor are they replacements for working with a qualified healthcare practitioner. It’s important to speak with your doctor before beginning any new dietary or lifestyle program, and please consult your physician before making any changes to medication or treatment protocols. Each individual’s results may vary.

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Dear Mark: Antibiotic Recovery, Sprinting on Keto, Preparing for Bad Sleep

For today’s edition of Dear Mark, I’m answering three questions. First up, what can a person do to help their gut recover its barrier function after too many antibiotics? Are there any foods, supplements, or dietary strategies? Second, what can explain rapid fatigue during sprint sessions on a keto diet? Is this simply part of the deal, or are there modifications you can make? And finally, what do I do when I know I’m going to get a bad night’s sleep?

Let’s go:

Mark – any idea how to cure leaky gut caused by overuse of antibiotics. Tried raw dairy for a month to no avail.

First of all, check out my post on leaky gut. Read through it and follow my suggestions for preventing and treating intestinal permeability. It’s a great place to start.

Then, let’s look at some other interventions that have been shown to improve recovery from antibiotic therapy. While most of the studies referenced don’t explicitly describe antibiotic-induced leaky gut, anything that improves gut function and restores healthy gut bacteria will also normalize leaky gut—since it’s the eradication of native gut bacteria that causes antibiotic-induced leaky gut.

Fermented dairy. You tried raw dairy. What about fermented dairy? While raw dairy has its merits, it’s fermented dairy that just works for recovery from antibiotics. Yogurt is a good option to try, although the evidence is a bit inconsistent. Kefir is probably better; it’s been shown to improve patients’ tolerance to triple antibiotic therapy during treatment for H. pylori infection. This is even worth consuming during antibiotic therapy, as many of the probiotic bacteria found in fermented dairy show resistance to common antibiotics.

Fermented vegetables like sauerkraut are also must-eats. The fermented cabbage contains ample amounts of L. plantarum, a bacteria strain that’s been shown to prevent antibiotic-related diarrhea in piglets (another omnivorous mammal). Good options exist in stores (check the refrigerated section; shelf-stable pickles and kraut aren’t lactofermented), and even more are available in farmer’s markets, but the best way to get the most bacteria-rich vegetable ferments is to make your own.

Supplemental probiotics are fantastic here, too: large doses of the desired microorganisms delivered directly to your gut. Some of the strains used in Primal Probiotics, like B. clausii and S. boulardii, have been shown to be effective against antibiotic-related diarrhea, so that could be a good choice.

Don’t forget the food for your gut bugs: prebiotics. You need to eat fermentable fibers and other prebiotics like resistant starch to support the growth and maintenance of the helpful bacteria that improve gut barrier function. Consider eating cooked and cooled potatoes, unheated potato starch, leeks, garlic, onions, green bananas, apples, pears, berries, and pretty much any fruit or vegetable you can get your hands on. Plenty of them are low-carb enough to work on a keto diet, if that’s your desire. Oh, and dark chocolate is a great source of fiber and polyphenols, which have prebiotic effects in the gut.

Incorporate intermittent fasting. Going without food for a spell gives your gut a break and induces autophagy, which can help with tissue healing.

Get dirty, too, to introduce potentially helpful bacteria. Go out and garden. Go barefoot at the park (do your due/doo diligence, of course) and practice tumbling, or roughhouse with your kids (or friends). Don’t immediately rush to wash your hands all the time (unless you’ve been handling raw meat and/or dog poop).

Whatever you do, don’t stress too much about the antibiotics you had to take. Stress is awful for gut health and you’ve already taken the antibiotics—which were probably necessary—so that ship has sailed.

If probiotics with prebiotics aren’t helping (or making things worse), you might want to try going the opposite direction—removing all plant foods and doing a carnivore diet for a few weeks. While I have doubts about the long term viability and safety of eschewing all plant foods, enough people have written to me about their great experiences resolving gut issues with a bout of carnivory that it’s worth trying.

When on a strict keto plan, why do I become so quickly fatigued while attempting a HIT sprint workout?

The first five seconds of a sprint are primarily powered by phosphocreatine (or creatine phosphate), a “quick burst” energy source that burns hot but disappears quickly. This is the stuff used to perform max effort Olympic lifts, short sprints, and other rapid expressions of maximum power. It doesn’t last very long and takes a couple minutes to replenish itself. A keto diet doesn’t affect our creatine phosphate levels. If anything, it should improve them if we’re eating meat.

After five seconds, anaerobic metabolism of muscle glycogen provides the lion’s share of your energy needs. The longer your sprint, the more glycogen you’ll burn. The less glycogen you carry in your muscles, the shorter your sprint. Because once you run out of creatine phosphate and glycogen, you’re left with aerobic metabolism—great for longer distances, not so great for max effort sprints.

Keto dieters tend to walk around with less glycogen in their muscles. If that’s the case, longer sprints will be harder.

If you want to keep sprinting:

Do shorter sprints. Try a 10-second hill sprint rather than a 20-second one. Really go hard. Heck, you can even do 5-second sprints and derive major benefits; just do more of them and make sure to recover in between. There’s no rule saying you have to sprint for 20-30 seconds.

Take longer rest periods. Give your muscles a chance to replenish more creatine phosphate (and take creatine or eat red meat and fish, which are the best sources of dietary creatine).

Eat 20-30 grams of carbs 30 minutes before a sprint session. See if it helps. Alternatively, you can eat the 20-30 grams of carbs after the sprint session to replenish lost glycogen stores (without really impacting your ketone adaptation, by the way).

Most people figure out their sprinting sweet spot while doing keto. They may have to play around with the dosages, durations, and rest periods, but you can usually make it work. Be open to trying new permutations.

If you knew you were going to have a poor nights sleep, what measures would you take to reduce some of the damage?

I would exercise hard that night. Normally, a bad night’s sleep tanks your insulin sensitivity the next day, giving you the insulin resistance and glucose tolerance of a diabetic. A good hard interval session the night before a bad night’s sleep, however, counters the next-day insulin resistance.

I would make the most of it. Don’t dawdle. Don’t beat yourself up because of the impending sleep deprivation. It’s going to happen. You have to accept it, not let it destroy you.

Enjoy it. A little-known acute treatment for depression is sleep deprivation. That’s right: a single night of sleep deprivation has been shown to ameliorate depression in patients with clinical depression. Sometimes the effect lasts up to several weeks. It’s not a long term or sustainable fix for clinical depression, obviously, and you can’t do it every single night—chronic sleep deprivation is a major risk factor for developing depression—but it can improve your mood if you give in to it.

I would set out a jar of cassia cinnamon. I always add cassia cinnamon to my coffee in the morning after bad sleep; cassia cinnamon the day after a bad night’s sleep attenuates the loss of insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance.

That’s it for today, folks. Thanks for writing in and reading! If you have any input on today’s round of questions, let me know down below.

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References:

De vrese M, Kristen H, Rautenberg P, Laue C, Schrezenmeir J. Probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in a fermented milk product with added fruit preparation reduce antibiotic associated diarrhea and Helicobacter pylori activity. J Dairy Res. 2011;78(4):396-403.

Bekar O, Yilmaz Y, Gulten M. Kefir improves the efficacy and tolerability of triple therapy in eradicating Helicobacter pylori. J Med Food. 2011;14(4):344-7.

Erginkaya Z, Turhan EU, Tatl? D. Determination of antibiotic resistance of lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional Turkish fermented dairy products. Iran J Vet Res. 2018;19(1):53-56.

Yang KM, Jiang ZY, Zheng CT, Wang L, Yang XF. Effect of Lactobacillus plantarum on diarrhea and intestinal barrier function of young piglets challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88. J Anim Sci. 2014;92(4):1496-503.

Jitomir J, Willoughby DS. Cassia cinnamon for the attenuation of glucose intolerance and insulin resistance resulting from sleep loss. J Med Food. 2009;12(3):467-72.

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Dear Mark: Exercise-Induced Asthma, CBD for Diabetes, Warm-ups In the Morning

For today’s edition of Dear Mark, I’m answering three questions from readers. First, what’s the deal with exercise-induced asthma? Is there anything we can do to lessen its impact and incidence? Second, is CBD oil helpful for diabetics? And finally, do bodyweight exercises always require warm-ups? What about workouts in general—do you need to warm-up before every single session?

Let’s find out:

The first question comes from Caue Cavallaro:

since you are the go-to person when it’s about health, for me, do you have any material related to exercise induced asthma? I had it every now and then but since I started training for triathlon it’s happening more often. Thank you!

This is a classic response. When I was doing triathlon (and training others in the sport), exercise-induced asthma was incredibly common. These were some of the fittest people on the planet, and yet they were wheezing and coughing like they were completely out of shape.

The common denominator was inflammation and oxidative stress. Back then, most of us didn’t know anything about either—and we were loading our bodies with tons of both. Anything you can do to reduce excess inflammation and oxidative stress in a healthy, sustainable manner will help.

First and foremost, how are you training? I’d really consider getting your hands on Primal Endurance or reading this post. The quick and dirty version is that to train the aerobic pathway, you have to go easier and slower than you think. Take 180 and subtract your age. That’s your target heart rate. Stay under it to remain aerobic. You’ll go so slow and so easy that it won’t even feel like you’re training. This will increase how fast you can go while remaining in the aerobic fat-burning zone, and it will limit your tendency to overtrain. Overtraining is the primary reason for exercise-induced asthma because when you overtrain, you’re heaping excessive inflammation and oxidative stress on your system. And you’re doing it every single time you train.

This “easier” style of endurance training is totally applicable to triathlon. Spend a good month or so (longer for most, but you’re probably reasonably fit and ahead of the game) focusing on that for the bulk of your training, building that aerobic base. Pepper in some more intense stuff, some “race pace” running/swimming/biking, some strength training and sprints.

How are you eating? Too many seed oils high in omega-6 fats and too many refined carbohydrates (to support the overtraining, of course) will tilt the balance toward inflammation and oxidative stress. Switch over to more saturated and monounsaturated fat sources, like butter, coconut oil, avocado oil, and olive oil. Be sure to eat fatty fish or take fish oil to balance out your omega-3:omega-6 ratio. Eat fewer carbs, and even consider going keto to enhance your fat-adaptation. The low carb approach goes hand in hand with training easier in the aerobic zone, as it demands less carbohydrate.

You’ll want to support your glutathione production with whey protein, raw dairy, and NAC supplements. Glutathione is the body’s premier in-house antioxidant. We most famously use it to detoxify harmful substances like alcohol and reduce oxidative stress, but glutathione also combines with nitric oxide to become a potent bronchodilator called nitrosoglutathione. Bronchodilators open up the airways and facilitate air flow. Having inadequate glutathione can impair your production of nitrosoglutathione and make your asthma worse—or trigger it.

Choline can help. Studies have shown that getting some extra choline reduces the airway inflammation and oxidative stress in people with asthma. You can take a choline supplement or eat a few egg yolks each day.

Good luck!

Regarding CBD/hemp oil, Carmen asked:

Is there oil for diabetics??

They’ve actually looked at CBD for diabetics. In animal studies, it reduces the incidence of diabetes and shows promise against diabetic complications like high glucose-induced endothelial dysfunction.

But the only human study was a bit of a dud. It compared CBD alone, CBD with THC, and THC alone in people with type 2 diabetes. Only the THC alone improved blood sugar, pancreatic beta cell function, and lipid numbers. CBD was ineffective, if harmless.

When you say, as soon as you wake up, do a quick superset of pushups – doesn’t it require a warm-up session beforehand? Can you really do them right away, as soon as you get out of bed? Is a warm-up not always essential?

I mean, you don’t have to do them right away. I can definitely see an argument for brushing the teeth and having some coffee first. For waking up a bit to get the most out of your workout. But if you work out on a regular basis and have a good base level of strength—which our commenter seems to have—you should be able to do basic bodyweight exercises without much of a warm-up.

If pushups are a major effort for a particular person, then a warm-up is a good idea.

As for the essentiality of warm-ups in general? Warm-ups become necessary when we stop moving for most of the day and do a big workout a few times a week. Warm-ups are necessary when we sit for 10 hours a day, using terrible posture the entire time. Warm-ups are important if you’re going really hard, really intense, and really heavy (think a big CrossFit WOD, a set of heavy deadlifts, or something similar). Warm-ups aren’t as essential if you make your entire lifestyle a movement session.

Thanks for reading, everyone. If you have any comments, input, or questions, leave it down below!

Take care.

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References:

Mehta AK, Singh BP, Arora N, Gaur SN. Choline attenuates immune inflammation and suppresses oxidative stress in patients with asthma. Immunobiology. 2010;215(7):527-34.

Weiss L, Zeira M, Reich S, et al. Cannabidiol arrests onset of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. Neuropharmacology. 2008;54(1):244-9.

Rajesh M, Mukhopadhyay P, Bátkai S, et al. Cannabidiol attenuates high glucose-induced endothelial cell inflammatory response and barrier disruption. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2007;293(1):H610-9.

Jadoon KA, Ratcliffe SH, Barrett DA, et al. Efficacy and Safety of Cannabidiol and Tetrahydrocannabivarin on Glycemic and Lipid Parameters in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Parallel Group Pilot Study. Diabetes Care. 2016;39(10):1777-86.

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