Keto Zoodle Alfredo

People say they love pasta, but often what they really crave is the sauce. Not that pasta is merely a “filler,” however. Noodles offer a nice texture and lighter feel—putting the sauce in a proper proportion of taste and richness within the overall dish. That may be especially true with alfredo, one of the richest sauces around. Its creamy fullness is hard to resist, and with this low-carb zoodle recipe, you won’t have to.

Servings:6

Time in the Kitchen: 20 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 3 spiralized zucchinis
  • 1 tub (250 g) organic cream cheese
  • 1 cup macadamia milk
  • 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • pinch of ground nutmeg
  • 1 tbsp. Italian parsley (optional for garnish)
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions:

Boil zoodles in sea-water-salty water for a few minutes and drain.

For sauce, heat cream cheese with 1 cup each milk and Parmesan in a nonstick pot. Bring to a soft boil.

Season with a dash of ground nutmeg, and salt and pepper to taste.

Put zoodles in serving dish or broil-safe dish if you wish to broil for a baked look as pictured.

Pour enough sauce on zoodles and broccoli to cover them. (Note: This recipe makes enough sauce to cover almost twice as many Zoodles as pictured. There will be plenty for leftovers!)

Top zoodle mixture with extra Parmesan, black pepper and chopped Italian parsley.

Broil if desired. Serve on its own or with baked chicken, and enjoy!

Nutritional Info (per serving):

  • Calories: 230
  • Carbs: 5.2 grams
  • Fat: 20 grams
  • Protein: 8.7 grams

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Low-Carb & Keto Chayote “Apple” Crisp

Chayote squash is having its day in the sun as of late, but it’s been used for centuries in Latin American cooking and baking. The chayote squash (also known as mirliton squash) is a mild-tasting, relatively low carb, and versatile fruit with a good dose of vitamin C. Because of its hardness, you’ll definitely want to eat it cooked, but the end result will be worth it: a tender but slightly crisp fruit that bears a resemblance to pear or jicama and that takes on the particular flavors of any recipe—sweet or savory.

Note: there’s a little extra prep involved with chayote, but we think the additional few minutes are well worth the approximately 50 grams of carbs spared (full recipe).

Time In the Kitchen: 20 minutes

Servings: 6

Ingredients:

Filling

  • 5 cups chayote squash
  • 1 tbsp cream of tartar
  • 5 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup Swerve (or equivalent of favorite sugar-free sweetener (e.g. monk fruit, etc.)

Crumble Topping

Instructions:

Preheat oven 350 ºF/175 ºC

Prep the squash. (This video has a good rundown of the process.) In a nutshell, cut the top inch off the fruit and let the liquid bubble up on the exposed flesh of the fruit. Rub the cut top piece over the exposed area for a full minute to draw up and out more liquid. This will create a froth as pictured. After the full minute, wipe off this froth with a clean paper towel. (Although the liquid/froth is completely safe, it may cause a mild tingly feeling if you get it on your fingers.)

Cut the fruit in half and remove the seed, along with the white flesh directly around it.

Cut squash into 1/4 inch slices.

Place in pot along with cinnamon, arrowroot or cream of tartar, lemon juice and sweenter. Cook over medium heat for about 10 minutes so that the squash starts to become tender.

Pour into ramekins.

Put all the crumble topping ingredients into a food processor and pulse until the butter is well incorporated and it looks good and crumbly.

Pour over top of squash.

Bake 30 minutes (or 45 minutes if baking as an 8-inch pie)

Nutritional Information (per serving)

  • Calories: 345
  • Net Carbs: 8 grams
  • Fat: 28 grams
  • Protein: 12 grams

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Instant Pot Oxtail Stew

People don’t talk about oxtail stew these days, but it’s a true Primal-worthy classic. With an arguably richer taste than beef and more succulent feel when cooked for stew or soup, oxtail might just become a new favorite. But the real difference (and reason behind the appealing stewed texture) is the ample connective tissue—an incredible source of collagen for the benefit of skin, hair, joint health, performance and more. (Since we used bone broth here in lieu of water or regular stock, this recipe is one of the best you can make for collagen content.) You’ll enjoy warming up with this gelatinous, flavorful and hearty dish on a late winter night. And you might consider making an extra batch: it tastes even better the next day.

Time In the Kitchen: 25 minutes (plus cook time)

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds grass-fed oxtail
  • 1 1/4 cup beef bone broth
  • 1/4 cup Primal Kitchen® Barbecue Sauce
  • 1 lb. small red potatoes (about 6), cut into bite-size pieces
  • 4 large carrots, cut into 1-inch-thick slices
  • 1 large onion, cut into bite-size pieces
  • 2 slices nitrate-free bacon, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions:

Heat Instant Pot on Saute and crisp chopped bacon. Remove and drain on paper towel.

Season oxtail and sear on all sides in bacon fat (3 min per side).

Add in other ingredients and cook 45 minutes on Manual High (Sealed). Let vent 15 minutes.

For slow cooker: cook bacon and sear oxtail in separate pan. Then cook all ingredients in slow cooker on low for 8 hours.

Nutritional Information (per serving):

  • Calories: 719 
  • Net Carbs: 24.6 grams
  • Fat: 36 grams
  • Protein: 67 grams

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